The conservation and heritage charity for the
Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park

Explore Nature

Whether you are planning a first visit or are lucky enough to live in Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park, this is the place to find out about its fabulous wildlife – what to see, where to see it, and when to look. 

And if you're a school group or class that's interested in taking part in our Wild.Lomond - Wild.Trossachs competition, this is the place to get lots of ideas about nature and wildlife species in the National Park, so you can develop your 'Species Tales'.....read on and explore the site!  There will be more info here as the project develops, and shortlisted and winning entries will all be available here in due course.

Butterwort in flowerThere are descriptions of nearly 70 species of plants and animals found in the rich variety of habitats that make up the Park. There are photos, descriptions, details of locations in the Park where you can find them, and the best times of year to look. Some will have audio or video links too.

If you want to discover more there are links on this page and in the profiles to the many organisations that work within the Park to protect and promote its wildlife.

We want you to visit our website again and again – but Wild Lomond is just the doorway. We really want you to step outside and see the Park for yourself. There are thousands of species to discover, hundreds of places to explore, and every season to enjoy. Find out more on the About Us page.

 

2 Thoughts for exporers of this site:

"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us.  When we see land as a community to which we belong we may begin to use it with love and respect"

Aldo Leopold, in his book Sand County Almanac 1949

"The near landscape is valuable and lovable because of its nearness, not something to be disregarded and shrugged off; it is where children are reared and what they take away in their minds to their long future.  What ground could be more hallowed?"

Frank Fraser Darling, BBC Reith Lectures 1969 Wilderness and Plenty

Any natural place contains an infinite reservoir of information, and therefore the potential for inexhaustible new discoveries.

Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods