The conservation and heritage charity for the
Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park

Park People

St Kentigerna (died c. 730AD)

This female saint decided to become a hermit or recluse, after she was widowed. She is sometimes described as the patron saint of Loch Lomond after setting up on Inchcailloch - the ‘island of the old women’ referring to the nunnery that she founded there.

Mary Queen of Scots (1542-1587)

Perhaps the most famous and intriguing of Scotland’s monarchs, Mary ‘s main association with the National Park area is her connection to Inchmahome Priory, on an island in the Lake of Menteith. She was sent there for safety, before her departure for France, when she was five years old. To the west, just beyond the edge of the Park, Doune Castle has 'Queen Mary's apartments' - noted for their early form of central heating!

Rob Roy's grave in Balquhidder kirkyardRob Roy Macgregor (1671-1734)

Perhaps the most famous figure associated with the area – catlle dealer, protection racket operator, folk hero, swordsman of repute, tartan Robin Hood – whatever the description, Rob Roy lived through one of Scotland’s most turbulent times, spending most of his life within today’s Park boundaries.

Queen Victoria (1819-1901)

Victoria made many journeys through Scotland in her long reign. This included in September 1842 a trip along Loch Tay to Killin and over Glen Ogle to Lochearnhead. This was the occasion when the Queen remarked in her diary of Glen Ogle’s resemblance to the Khyber Pass! There was also an extensive visit to Callander and the Trossachs in 1869. (They stayed at Invertrossachs House, which had had its name changed from Drunkie House as this was thought to be inappropriate! Loch Drunkie is still nearby.) Amongst their many excursions was one to Loch Lomond and also the Lake of Menteith.