The conservation and heritage charity for the
Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park

Freshwater & Wetlands

Loch Lomond is the biggest area of fresh water in the Park, and indeed in the whole of Britain, but there are 22 sizeable lochs in all, along with around 50 rivers, so wherever you choose to go in the Park you will probably find yourself close to water. The lochs are mostly quite poor in nutrients, which means that they can support some special wildlife that can’t survive in more nutrient-rich water. The rivers often start as boulder-strewn, tumbling burns high in the hills, slowing and softening as they reach the lowlands.

All this water is also essential to maintain the wetland habitats - marshes, bogs, fens, mudflats – that provide a home and food for so much of our wildlife. White-fronted geese travel all the way from Greenland to feed on the marshland at the foot of Loch Lomond, otter and water vole find refuge, dippers love the fast-flowing streams, while salmon and trout return each year to spawn in the headwaters of our rivers.

The list below will tell you about some of the wildlife to be found in the Park’s freshwater and wetlands. There are also links to other websites where you can find out more.

Dipper
Dipper

Globeflower
Globeflower

Whitefronts
Greenland white fronted goose

Salmon
Salmon

Otter
Otter

Water Vole
Water vole

Image of Pike
Pike

Image of Trout
Trout

Newt
Newt


Scottish dock

Frog
Frog

Toad
Toad

 

 

 


 

Any natural place contains an infinite reservoir of information, and therefore the potential for inexhaustible new discoveries.

Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods