The conservation and heritage charity for the
Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park

Wood sorrel

Latin name: Oxalis acetosella

Height: Up to 10cmWood sorrel

Where: Mostly in deciduous woodland, for example on Inchcailloch

When: Flowers late April and May

Wood sorrel isn’t actually related to any of the sorrel family, but nibble one of its shamrock-shaped leaves and you’ll understand its name. It has the same green-apple sharpness as its namesake, perhaps also leading to one of its Gaelic names, ‘greim saighdeir’, meaning ‘soldier’s mouthful’.

You will see its delicate pink-veined white flowers in April and May, often in more shady patches of woodland away from the blue and white carpets of bluebells and wood anemones. Although you most often find it in woods it sometimes appears on mountain sides, perhaps a sign that there may once have been a wooded hillside there.

Any natural place contains an infinite reservoir of information, and therefore the potential for inexhaustible new discoveries.

Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods