The conservation and heritage charity for the
Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park

Forests & Woodland

Most of the Park’s trees have been planted by people over the last 400 years, but the wildlife don’t seem to mind.The oakwoods that line many of our lochs and rivers were planted to provide wood for tanning and smelting, sometimes on top of existing woodlands. The conifer plantations that cloak many of our hills are still felled for timber. Yet they also offer food and shelter for many of our best loved animals and plants.

Perhaps not surprisingly many of the animals that choose to live here are shy and secretive. Look out for their tracks and signs – footprints, scats, and song, for example - when you walk through the woods. You may be rewarded by a glimpse of red squirrels, pine martens, or deer, or hear wood warblers and redstarts up in the tree canopy. Go in spring and what you are sure to see in the oakwoods is a carpet of wildflowers – bluebells, violets or wood anemones – taking advantage of the light before the leaves close in.

The list below will introduce you to some of the wildlife to be found in the Park’s forest and woodland habitats. There are also links to other websites where you can find out more.

Black grouse
Black grouse

Sessile Oak
Oak

Pine marten
Pine marten

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Wood ant

Red Squirrel image
Red squirrel

Roe Deer
Roe deer

Redstart
Redstart

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Pied flycatcher

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Wood warbler

Great Spotted Woodpecker
Great spotted woodpecker

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Birch

Pine tree
Scots pine

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Bluebell

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Violet

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Ramsons

Royal Buckler fern
Royal buckler fern

Wood Sorrel
Wood sorrel

 

 

Any natural place contains an infinite reservoir of information, and therefore the potential for inexhaustible new discoveries.

Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods